Blind View 2

What would happen if the view was not through the blind, but on the blind?

Closing the blind shows the view. Opening the blind hides the view.

Views could be portable. They could be created where they didn’t exist. You could pick your own view.

Peter Banks is an artist and photographer. He explores the potential of photography to make us question what we see and how we see it - the ambiguity that can be used to alter or heighten our interpretation of reality. He aims to create the shock, the surprise, the new way of seeing something that opens up alternative possibilities. He is interested in the relationship between what a photograph is and what it represents. What can be done to a photograph as well as what can be done in it.

He uses life-size photographic images to both cover and reveal their subjects – masking or boxing something in by its own image. He enjoys the ambiguity of photographic space and his work creates tensions between real form and space and a two-dimensional illusion of them.

He explores the idea of photos as the trace that people leave behind them and how photos can punch a hole through a current situation to reveal something of its past. He is intrigued by analysing the ordinary – isolating, ordering, framing, extracting, reflecting – as a way of understanding and affecting the interpretation of its meaning – like a forensic approach to a crime scene.

He believes that how and where you see things affects their meaning and he is keen to explore these possibilities and to access a wider public by developing and showing his work not just in conventional galleries, but also in a range of different public settings.

Peter Banks has exhibited widely in the UK and elsewhere at venues including:

AIR Gallery, Serpentine Gallery, Riverside Studios, Whitechapel Gallery in London; Whitworth Gallery, Peterloo Gallery in Manchester; Impressions Gallery in York; Midland Group in Nottingham; National Museum of Photography, Film And TV in Bradford, ARE in Belfast.

His work has also been displayed at a wide range of public venues, including shopping centres, railway stations, town centres, poster hoardings and derelict buildings.

He has received financial support from Arts Council, major galleries and commercial sponsors, as well as working to private commissions. His work has been featured in national press, specialist art and design journals and on line publications.

Peter Banks is an artist and photographer. He explores the potential of photography to make us question what we see and how we see it - the ambiguity that can be used to alter or heighten our interpretation of reality. He aims to create the shock, the surprise, the new way of seeing something that opens up alternative possibilities. He is interested in the relationship between what a photograph is and what it represents. What can be done to a photograph as well as what can be done in it.

He uses life-size photographic images to both cover and reveal their subjects – masking or boxing something in by its own image. He enjoys the ambiguity of photographic space and his work creates tensions between real form and space and a two-dimensional illusion of them.

He explores the idea of photos as the trace that people leave behind them and how photos can punch a hole through a current situation to reveal something of its past. He is intrigued by analysing the ordinary – isolating, ordering, framing, extracting, reflecting – as a way of understanding and affecting the interpretation of its meaning – like a forensic approach to a crime scene.

He believes that how and where you see things affects their meaning and he is keen to explore these possibilities and to access a wider public by developing and showing his work not just in conventional galleries, but also in a range of different public settings.

Peter Banks has exhibited widely in the UK and elsewhere at venues including:

AIR Gallery, Serpentine Gallery, Riverside Studios, Whitechapel Gallery in London; Whitworth Gallery, Peterloo Gallery in Manchester; Impressions Gallery in York; Midland Group in Nottingham; National Museum of Photography, Film And TV in Bradford, ARE in Belfast.

His work has also been displayed at a wide range of public venues, including shopping centres, railway stations, town centres, poster hoardings and derelict buildings.

He has received financial support from Arts Council, major galleries and commercial sponsors, as well as working to private commissions. His work has been featured in national press, specialist art and design journals and on line publications.

The website displays current work, along with the ideas and processes that underpin it, as well as acting as a comprehensive archive of past work and its development over time. The home page shows work currently in progress (below) and also features a display of the most recently completed piece (top of page). Previous work is accessed through the main menu. It is arranged chronologically with earlier pieces at the top of the menus and more recent at the bottom.

Some related pieces are grouped together. Most have supporting text and imagery. This includes related sequences of supporting images, videos and a developing record of how the piece evolved during production.

The purpose of the site is not to sell the work, at least not in a literal sense. In fact the majority of the work in Gallery Installations and Public Works no longer exists, other than as a photographic record. It was conceived and realised for a particular location at a particular time and was taken apart and destroyed at the end of that time.

Proposals for new installations, venues and commissions are always welcomed, as are your thoughts on the work displayed on the site.

 

The website displays current work, along with the ideas and processes that underpin it, as well as acting as a comprehensive archive of past work and its development over time. The home page shows work currently in progress (below) and also features a display of the most recently completed piece (top of page). Previous work is accessed through the main menu. It is arranged chronologically with earlier pieces at the top of the menus and more recent at the bottom.

Some related pieces are grouped together. Most have supporting text and imagery. This includes related sequences of supporting images, videos and a developing record of how the piece evolved during production.

The purpose of the site is not to sell the work, at least not in a literal sense. In fact the majority of the work in Gallery Installations and Public Works no longer exists, other than as a photographic record. It was conceived and realised for a particular location at a particular time and was taken apart and destroyed at the end of that time.

Proposals for new installations, venues and commissions are always welcomed, as are your thoughts on the work displayed on the site.

 

The work is produced from photographic imagery built into three-dimensional structures made from card, timber, wire, acrylic, glass and mirror.

They range from small-scale objects that fit in the hand to large structures and installations in galleries and public spaces.

Whether they are fully three-dimensional or wall-mounted relief structures, they change appearance and meaning when seen from different viewpoints.

 

Photographs and sequences are one-off images and narrative sequences.

Photosculptures are structures that incorporate or are made up of photographic imagery to create three-dimensional photographs.

Photopuzzles are three-dimensional games – sculptures to play with.

Gallery installations are works commissioned by contemporary art galleries and usually developed in the gallery space during the exhibition.

Public works are pieces carried out in a range of public venues, including poster hoardings, shopping centres and outdoor spaces. Many were commissioned by the venue or by third party funders.

Work in Progress…..

Work in progress is a display of new pieces at different stages of development. The content includes first thoughts and ideas, source material and influences, trials, experiments and mock-ups.

Each work is developed progressively and when it reaches a state of completion it is featured at the top of the home page and then is transferred to the main menu.

For more information click the Process button below

Borrowed Thoughts

In a Japanese garden the term “Shakkei” or “Borrowed Landscape” refers to the view beyond the garden. It is borrowed because it is not owned or controlled by the gardener, but it expands and gives context to the garden.

These thoughts do likewise.

A photograph is not only an image (as a painting is an image), an interpretation of the real; it is also a trace, something directly stencilled from the real, like a footprint or a death mask.

 

Susan Sontag

1977

My pictures are like maps, which perhaps only I can understand. Therefore, in following my maps there are some travellers who get lost. There are those who become angry when they discover they have been fooled; but there are also those who enter into the maze of my maps willingly, in an attempt to explore their accuracy for themselves.

 

Mitsumasa Anno

1980

Imagination (which is about impossibility) and reality aren’t opposites, but complement each other. One might say that reality and imagination differ from each other in the same way that the audience at a play is set apart from the actors. It’s where the two meet that hope is to be found.

Mitsumasa Anno

1980

 

A person who only looks for what he wants in painting will never find that which transcends his preferences. But, if one has been trapped by the mystery of an image which refuses all explanation, a moment of panic will sometimes occur. These moments of panic are what count for Magritte. For him they are privileged moments, because they transcend mediocrity. (But for that, there doesn’t have to be art – it can happen at any moment.)

 

Suzi Gablik

1970

The development of Magritte’s painting from 1924 until his death in 1967 may be studied by art historians; they will find him to be an artist who throughout his life confused every trail, displaced every landmark and turned dates into a jumble. It will suffice to say here that his work evolved from complexity to simplicity, from an outcry to eloquent silence, from arrogance to wisdom.

Since our friend left us, each of his pictures lives its own life and sheds on the world a magic radiance, so that we behold everyday sights through his eyes instead of our own.

 

E Langui

Brussels 1973

How slowly one advances in a boat that does not float with the stream in a specific direction! How much easier it is when one can connect with the work of great predecessors whose value is not doubted by anyone. A personal experiment, a construction whose foundations one must dig himself and whose walls one must erect himself, runs a real risk of becoming a humble hovel. But perhaps one prefers to live there rather than in a palace that has been built by others.

MC Escher  1958

Whosoever wants to portray something that does not exist has to obey certain rules. Those rules are more or less the same as for the teller of fairy tales: he has to apply the function of contrasts: he has to cause a shock.

The element of mystery to which he wants to call attention must be surrounded and veiled by perfectly ordinary everyday self-evidences that are recognizable to everyone. That environment, which is true to nature and acceptable to every superficial observer, is indispensable for causing the desired shock.

That is also why such a game can be played and understood only by those who are prepared to penetrate the surface, those who agree to use their brains, just as in the solving of a riddle. It is thus not a matter for the senses, but rather a cerebral matter. Profundity is not at all necessary, but a kind of humour and self-mockery is a must, at least for the person who makes the representations.

MC Escher  1958

Borrowed Thoughts

In a Japanese garden the term “Shakkei” or “Borrowed Landscape” refers to the view beyond the garden. It is borrowed because it is not owned or controlled by the gardener, but it expands and gives context to the garden. These thoughts do likewise.

A photograph is not only an image (as a painting is an image), an interpretation of the real; it is also a trace, something directly stencilled from the real, like a footprint or a death mask.

 

Susan Sontag

1977

My pictures are like maps, which perhaps only I can understand. Therefore, in following my maps there are some travellers who get lost. There are those who become angry when they discover they have been fooled; but there are also those who enter into the maze of my maps willingly, in an attempt to explore their accuracy for themselves.

 

Mitsumasa Anno

1980

Imagination (which is about impossibility) and reality aren’t opposites, but complement each other. One might say that reality and imagination differ from each other in the same way that the audience at a play is set apart from the actors. It’s where the two meet that hope is to be found.

Mitsumasa Anno

1980

 

A person who only looks for what he wants in painting will never find that which transcends his preferences. But, if one has been trapped by the mystery of an image which refuses all explanation, a moment of panic will sometimes occur. These moments of panic are what count for Magritte. For him they are privileged moments, because they transcend mediocrity. (But for that, there doesn’t have to be art – it can happen at any moment.)

 

Suzi Gablik

1970

The development of Magritte’s painting from 1924 until his death in 1967 may be studied by art historians; they will find him to be an artist who throughout his life confused every trail, displaced every landmark and turned dates into a jumble. It will suffice to say here that his work evolved from complexity to simplicity, from an outcry to eloquent silence, from arrogance to wisdom.

Since our friend left us, each of his pictures lives its own life and sheds on the world a magic radiance, so that we behold everyday sights through his eyes instead of our own.

 

E Langui

Brussels 1973

How slowly one advances in a boat that does not float with the stream in a specific direction! How much easier it is when one can connect with the work of great predecessors whose value is not doubted by anyone. A personal experiment, a construction whose foundations one must dig himself and whose walls one must erect himself, runs a real risk of becoming a humble hovel. But perhaps one prefers to live there rather than in a palace that has been built by others.

MC Escher  1958

Whosoever wants to portray something that does not exist has to obey certain rules. Those rules are more or less the same as for the teller of fairy tales: he has to apply the function of contrasts: he has to cause a shock.

The element of mystery to which he wants to call attention must be surrounded and veiled by perfectly ordinary everyday self-evidences that are recognizable to everyone. That environment, which is true to nature and acceptable to every superficial observer, is indispensable for causing the desired shock.

That is also why such a game can be played and understood only by those who are prepared to penetrate the surface, those who agree to use their brains, just as in the solving of a riddle. It is thus not a matter for the senses, but rather a cerebral matter. Profundity is not at all necessary, but a kind of humour and self-mockery is a must, at least for the person who makes the representations.

MC Escher  1958