Midland Group

 

This piece was carried out in the two shop windows of the Midland Group Gallery in Nottingham. It builds on the ideas developed from the Riverside Studios and AIR Gallery installations.

Photos were taken from inside the window of the view outside to the street and the people passing by. The resulting images were printed in reverse, fixed to frames and suspended in the window. Each print was located exactly in the position from which the photo was originally taken.

The composite view from the street described an exaggerated deep space, with an enlargement of the imagery at the front and a reduction at the rear of the piece. It also made use of the strong reflections in the window interacting with the reversed imagery in the prints. The effect was to create a complex spatial tapestry in which photographic and reflected images merged. As viewers moved past the window their images seemed to appear and disappear. As with Monet’s water lily paintings, there was a complex relationship set up between the lettering on the surface of the glass, the views through it and the images reflected off it.

Midland Group

This piece was carried out in the two shop windows of the Midland Group Gallery in Nottingham. It builds on the ideas developed from the Riverside Studios and AIR Gallery installations.

Photos were taken from inside the window of the view outside to the street and the people passing by. The resulting images were printed in reverse, fixed to frames and suspended in the window. Each print was located exactly in the position from which the photo was originally taken.

The composite view from the street described an exaggerated deep space, with an enlargement of the imagery at the front and a reduction at the rear of the piece. It also made use of the strong reflections in the window interacting with the reversed imagery in the prints. The effect was to create a complex spatial tapestry in which photographic and reflected images merged. As viewers moved past the window their images seemed to appear and disappear. As with Monet’s water lily paintings, there was a complex relationship set up between the lettering on the surface of the glass, the views through it and the images reflected off it.

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